Multiple Intelligence Theory – Understanding of Interests Help in Choosing the Right Career

Dr. Howard Gardner introduced and proposed the theory of ‘Multiple Intelligence’ in his book, “Frames of Mind” in the year 1983 and since then the theory has got universal acceptance. Many educators and educational Institutions have embraced this theory in meeting the learning requirements of the learners at various levels. The reason behind the overwhelming acceptance is the fact that there are eight possible ways of imparting education and also to understand a child’s interests and intelligence.

Dr. Gardner believes that every individual has either one or more than one of the following intelligences:

1. Verbal/Linguistic Intelligence

2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence

3. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence

4. Musical/Rhythmic Intelligence

5. Visual/Spatial Intelligence

6. Interpersonal Intelligence

7. Intrapersonal Intelligence

8. Naturalistic Intelligence.

1.Verbal/Linguistic Intelligence: People with verbal/linguistic kind of intelligence have a flair for languages; they nurture interest towards learning different languages and are able to do it quite faster than many others. They show special interest towards reading, writing and interacting with people. They like to participate in debates, discussions, seminars etc. They enjoying listening to lectures and taking notes. They are excellent in remembering any kind of information even dates. They are good in grammar, syntax and structure. They have the ability to explain things in details and teach people. People with verbal / linguistic Intelligence perform well in positions where they get opportunities to utilize the skills of language articulation. Usually they excel as teachers, lawyers, writers and politicians. They learn well through reading, listening to lectures in the class, taking notes, interacting with friends and do well in exams because of their good memory power.

2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: People with Logical/Mathematical intelligence have the ability to think in a logical manner. They have the ability to reason things. They are good at mathematical calculations. They are good at solving problems. They can play chess quite well. They excel as engineers, computer programmers, software developers, economists, accountants and scientists. They learn well when they are given logical and analytical problems to be solved. They perform extremely well in aptitude tests. They like to solve riddles and puzzles.

3. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: People with bodily/kinesthetic intelligence enjoy physical movement. They like to play and dance. Physical activity is more important for them. They do very well in the field of sports. They usually associate themselves with dance and the theatrical performances. Most of them fare well in similar professions. They learn well when the learning involves lot of physical activity more than classroom lectures.

4. Musical/Rhythmic Intelligence: People with this intelligence have musical bent of mind. They have natural inclination towards music. Music in any form attracts them. Students with such intelligence learn well in a musical environment. They have good listening skills. They appreciate music in any form or language and have sensitivity towards it. Naturally they fare well as singers, musicians and composers.

5. Visual/Spatial Intelligence: Such people have strong sense of judgment. They are good at imagination. They have strong ability to visualize. They have an artistic bent of mind. Naturally they fare well in creative arts. With their power of imagination they become good artistes, painters, designers, directors and architects. Students with this kind of intelligence learn well when their creative abilities are triggered by creating favorable environment in the classroom.

6. Interpersonal Intelligence: People with interpersonal skills have good social awareness. They understand people and their way of thinking. They have the ability to strike a conversation with a stranger. They never hesitate to talk to people. They are often described as extroverts. They become stars in any party they visit because of their conversational skills. They have team spirit. They fare well in public relation kind of jobs. They do well in the hospitality Industry and also as marketing professionals. Such students can do wonders if they are put in a team. They learn well in situations where they are required to talk and convince people.

7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: People with this intelligence have good self awareness. They perform better in isolation, than in teams. They are usually described as introverts. They do a lot of self- introspection. They understand themselves very well. They communicate with themselves quite often. They avoid conversation with others unless they are forced to talk. They fare well in desk jobs where there is no requirement of talking. They prefer to work silently on their own. They shine very well as writers, painters, philosophers, scientists and computer programmers.

8. Naturalistic Intelligence: People with naturalistic intelligence have inclination towards nature. They prefer to be close to nature. They like naturalistic atmosphere around them. Such students can learn better in natural settings. They do well as conversationalists, gardeners and agriculturists.

Book Review – The Lawyer’s Song: Navigating the Legal Wilderness

In his 2010 book entitled “The Lawyer’s Song: Navigating the Legal Wilderness” (“the Song”), Hugh Duvall sings a heartfelt tune about what it means – and what it ought to mean – to be a lawyer. Written from the perspective of a lawyer-litigator, the Song is intended to reach two main audiences. For non-lawyers, the Song is meant to provide “a window into the complex intellectual, emotional and ethical frontier of [the legal] profession.” For lawyers, it is an affirmation of all that is good in the legal profession – a melody meant to “charge us up and to speed us on our way.” Mr. Duvall performs to both audiences with admirable aplomb.

A quick and engaging read, the Song pursues its purpose in a refreshingly creative style. Each chapter (or verse) focuses on a key theme of legal practice; and each is presented in two parts. The first is a vignette of a story set in 1842 Oregon in which a woman hires a guide to lead her through the backcountry in search of her husband. With the chapter’s theme as a springboard, the second part dives into a non-fictitious account of the various ways in which the issues presented in the vignette affect the day-to-day lives of present-day lawyers.

Within its verses, the Song sings of the hard realities of legal practice. These include the risk and challenge of law school, the long lonely hours of legal practice, the anguish of a case fought and lost, and the betrayal of a thankless client. These darker notes are important for any law student or aspiring lawyer to hear – especially one bedazzled by the gloss of legal practice as it appears on the big screen.

Floating above the bass register are the treble notes of the more ennobling aspects of legal practice. These include the sanctity of the lawyer-client relationship, the humility of faithful service, the decorum of loyalty, and the thrill of victory. These higher notes give the Song a more edifying tenor for those who are uncertain or otherwise cynical about the inherent dignity of a legal career, or those otherwise in need of affirmation.

As much as the Song serves to demystify some of the realities of legal practice, at the same time it also serves to enshroud it in a cloud of romanticism. For example, laced into the narrative are some pretty rosy assumptions about what it is that drives people to pursue a career in law. As Mr. Duvall puts it:

Ours is a profession to which we were called. We were always aware of its presence. The feeling. The thought. The notion that we would become lawyers…It was one’s essence. One’s being. There was no real choice involved at all.

It would be nice if this were true. But the reality is that all sorts of people go to law school (and eventually become lawyers) for far lesser reasons. Some go to law school to please their parents. Others go because they want money, security and prestige. Still others go because they don’t know what else to do with themselves. Yet once on the conveyor belt, the pressure to identify as a lawyer gets stronger and stronger. Years later, well into their careers, all too many wake up and realize that what they are doing is not their calling – that this is not their song.

The romanticism of the Song also surfaces in other verses. For example, in the verse about “passion”, Mr. Duvall notes that “[w]e cannot meet the rigorous challenges we regularly confront without passion for our work.” Lawyers, just like anybody else, are much better equipped to do their jobs when fuelled by passion. Yet the truth is that on the whole lawyers aren’t exactly known for their passion for their work. In fact, many plod their weary ways through their entire careers without much enthusiasm for their jobs at all.

While Mr. Duvall may be romantic, he is not blind. As he notes, many lawyers do such things as “take shortcuts to the prejudice of the client”, “make as much money as possible”, “gain attention for personal aggrandizement”, and “run a business as opposed to a law practice.” It is clear that Mr. Duvall is fully aware that such “imposters” exist among our ranks; the simple fact of the matter is that they are not part of his intended audience.

While such “imposters” may well not deserve admission to Mr. Duvall’s performance, I contend that they constitute a third audience that must not only attend, but also listen extra carefully. For it is to this audience that the Song carries a special – albeit implicit – message. And that message is this:

If you are not in harmony with the basic values of your profession, you must do something about it or your career and life will ever be dissonant.

In listening to the Song, should anyone find themselves scoffing or otherwise rolling their eyes in cynicism at its lyrics, then it may well be that they belong to this third audience. Should they recognize the special message the Song has for them, and should they be inspired to take corrective action, Mr. Duvall will have truly outdone himself.

Bravo, Mr. Duvall!

Lawyers Deserve Respect Too

Recently a prominent female Philadelphia lawyer was quoted in a newspaper article about an equal pay settlement she had reached with her former law firm, stating that she would never encourage her daughter to become a lawyer. Her opinion surprised me because her career was commendable and encompassed practicing with a large national law firm, having a top position as a lawyer in local government, and starting and operating her own law firm. I don’t agree that law is a poor career choice for women, but it is definitely a difficult career which requires working long hours, suffering frequent stress, and sometimes receiving little gratitude from the very people lawyers try to help. As a result, it is important for lawyers to develop thick skins in order to receive the most job satisfaction from practicing law.

There are many areas of legal practice, and not all of them involve dealing with the general public and/or regularly appearing before courts and legal forums. Often the stress of law involves being expected to bill a certain number of billable hours. Depending on one’s area(s) of practice, there are two primary means in which lawyers receive payment. They either bill in increments of an hour at an hourly rate, or if there is a contingency fee agreement, they collect their fees at the end of a case, it is tried or won in court. Sometimes there is a hybrid arrangement, which is the combination of the above two kinds of billing.

I have retained and paid lawyers for legal matters, so I am in the same position as my clients, but I respect lawyers, even if I wasn’t thrilled with the results, or I wasn’t pleased that I had to hire lawyers, because I felt the lawyers provided me with the best service they could. LET ME BE CLEAR-VERY FEW PEOPLE ARE HAPPY TO PAY THEIR LAWYERS. But, lawyers have to work within the legal system, which makes many demands on them. Although I respect lawyers, that respect is often lacking in others. Most lawyers have been on the receiving end of comments from former, current and potential clients which are rude, obnoxious and abusive. I can’t think of any other profession whose members have to endure this type of behavior. This abuse generally arises because: 1) the client is not happy with their situation or the legal process, and takes it out on the lawyer; or 2) the client is trying to avoid paying their bill and comes up with every excuse under the book to avoid payment.

For some reason clients forget or ignore that law firms are businesses, and not charities. I would love to be able to call the IRS and all of my creditors and tell them that as they obviously have a lot more money than me, so they should waive what I owe them. Of course this is ridiculous, yet it is a request I hear every so often after the client has exceeded their retainer and requests or requires additional services. Recently a client stated that it was not Godly and moral for me to request payment, after owing us an amount for years, because she allegedly can’t afford it. Although we are often willing to work within a client’s budget, our bills must be paid. We have salaries and bills to pay, an office building to maintain, and we also support other businesses whose services we use for supplies and various reasons. It is not fair not when clients ask us to feel their pain, but they don’t feel they have to treat us fairly.

Here are common questions clients have about bills:

1.) Clients sometimes express surprise that lawyers charge for phone calls and e mails on hourly rate cases, although this occupies a large part of their day. With the advent of e mail, clients often send many e mails a day and expect a quick response. Our fee agreements clearly states that we bill for these services. Let’s see how it works out if we didn’t charge for this time. As an example, let’s say there are 7 billable hours in a day (although my days are far longer), or 420 minutes. If I spend time on behalf of 15 current clients for e mails, or I spend time on calls with or regarding them, and I spend an average of 12 minutes on each call or e mail, that is 180 minutes or 3 hours. If 15 potential clients call or e mail me and I spend an average of 6 minutes speaking with them, that is another, 1½ hours or 90 minutes. That leaves 150 minutes or 2½ hours for me to attend meetings with other lawyers, clients or staff, or dealing with correspondence or legal documents. Using my $280 billable hourly rate for 2013 (which, by the way, is far too low based on my level of experience), and I don’t charge for the 3 hours above, I am losing potential fees of $840 a day, or $4,200 a week, or $210,000 a year. I would never ask my clients or any other professionals to work 3 hours a day for free.

People don’t often realize that lawyers, including me, contribute a great deal of unpaid time as they don’t charge for every minute of their time, they try and counsel people who aren’t certain how to deal with the legal system for free, and they often do some firm of pro bono work. WE NOT ONLY DESERVE SOME RESPECT, WE DESERVE A LOT OF RESPECT!

Law Careers – Top 10 Law Careers

If you are studying law or considering a career in law then you must at the very beginning analyze what do want to become after passing your law course. In the field of law like the other fields there are abundant career options. If you don’t want to get stuck in an office you can practice independently. Just make sure the profession you choose must be one that matches your temperament, interests and passions. After a point of time, you might get bored and in case of heavy hectic schedule you might just end up quitting. These are a few career options available in the field of law –

1) Public service lawyer take up the administrative roles in the larger interest of serving the public. You can also take up job with local NGOs and do legal public work, fight cases for the underprivileged or the poor. You can also take up administrative roles like that of a policy officer and a project manager. A guy with a big heart would just fit into this field. The money might be a little less compared to other sectors but there is a lot of personal satisfaction.

2) The legal issues are most common in business sector. In order to get a stabilized and continuous growth businesses to indulge in certain misconduct and hire lawyers in bulk to attend to the legal standards of the business and especially be able to meet the demands of the government to have to continuous growth. In corporate sectors and huge multi national companies have a huge demand for corporate lawyers and this profession will have a great lucrative value for a long time to come.

3) You can also go in for legal research which is a more adventurous brand of work. You have immense personal satisfaction and the work will be interesting if you have knack and passion for it.

4) A lawyer can take up work with he non government organizations or humanitarian centers working for the same purpose. The lawyers in this field must be sincere or they don’t stand a chance.

5) The lawyers can also find jobs in law enforcement agencies like the secret service, CIA and so on. They can enroll themselves with the police and any such law enforcing group who always need lawyers.

6) They can find jobs in hospitals. Hospital is a very volatile and sensitive area and if5. Hospitals always have a high job requirement for lawyers to support their entire system.

7) Working in regular government offices more like an administrative job is very common for those who have pursued law; they have a better sense of administration. This is not a public service job as such.

8) They are required in large numbers in media houses. Being a controversial field it is, media houses need legal support to save their skin all the time as they keep landing in trouble.

9) Lawyers can go in for journalism as well as any political news have a legal angle to it and the lawyers can help them analyze the nuances of it.

10) They can go in for social service as social workers. They will be more capable of doing this than just working with them as a resident lawyer.

How Can You Choose the Right Career

How can you choose the right career? It can be hard to know which career will be a good fit for you. These are ways that you can choose the right career.

o Take a career aptitude test- Career aptitude tests are great tools which can help you determine which job skills you have. A career aptitude test will ask you questions and will give you a list of careers that you might be suited for that matches your answers.

o Talk to a career counselor- career counselor can offer you sound advice on career choices that might suit you.

o Try internships- internships are a great way to try careers before committing to one in particular. High schools and colleges usually have listings for great internships for students.

o Meet with people who have different careers- the best way to learn about different careers is to go directly to the source. You should try and get in contact with family members, and other people that you know and see what their careers entail and see if you are interested in pursuing any of those careers.

How can you choose the right career? This answer depends on your attitude and goals towards your potential career. You need to know what you like to do and what your interests are.

You need to know how dedicated you are. For instance, if you do not like going to school then being a doctor, lawyer, or teacher is probably not the right career choice for you. You need to know the education and credentials that are necessary in each potential career choice that you are interested in.

Deciding on a career choice is a very difficult thing to do. You need to really contemplate your career choice before investing time and money into trying to achieve the necessary education and credentials that your career choice entails.

Hopefully, this article will answer the question how can you choose the right career?